Looking for a Driveway Installation in Piedmont

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About Driveway Installation

DRIVEWAY PAVING AND RESURFACING

Arrow Asphalt LLC ‐ Driveway Before and After Professional driveway resurfacing can provide great savings to local property owners. Instead of ripping up your existing driveway and starting all over, asphalt resurfacing lets you renew the appearance and condition of your blacktop with far less labor and cost involved.

When sealcoating alone isn’t enough to improve your driveway’s surface, it’s time to contact Arrow Asphalt LLC for commercial driveway resurfacing that will save you a bundle in the long run. We also resurface driveway pavement for homeowners in Oklahoma City / Norman / Moore / Yukon and nearby areas. Call us today to schedule an appointment!

NEED AN ESTIMATE?

Why run up a hefty tab for total driveway replacement when all you might need is asphalt driveway resurfacing? In addition to saving you money, resurfacing a driveway also requires significantly less time and turmoil than building a whole new driveway. By leaving the base of your pavement as is and only replacing the topmost surface, Arrow Asphalt LLC can help you avoid the headache and hassle of a major driveway overhaul.

Our driveway resurfacing process is surprisingly fast and straightforward, including:

  • Debris removal
  • Crack sealing
  • Hole filling
  • Asphalt replenishment
  • Sealcoat application

AND ANYTHING ELSE YOU NEED!

During the course of our driveway resurfacing service, we can address any existing flaws in your pavement such as cracks, soft spots, pot holes, and more. Once those issues are taken care of, we’ll add a fresh layer of asphalt for your new driveway surface. It’s like getting a whole new driveway but you only pay the cost of driveway paving and resurfacing. Call us today to find out whether asphalt driveway resurfacing is an appropriate choice for your property.

Cost‐Effective Driveway Resurfacing Options

Whatever condition your current driveway or parking lot paving is in, Arrow Asphalt LLC can do a full assessment of the damage and get your asphalt issues resolved. Sometimes, we’re able to save our customers significant money and time through our driveway resurfacing options. If it turns out you’re a good candidate for resurfacing driveway blacktop, then we’ll be glad to spare you the trouble of driveway or parking lot paving from scratch. No driveway resurfacing job is ever too big or too small for our Oklahoma City‐based paving company. We’re pleased to assist local businesses with driveway resurfacing options for restaurants, offices, stores, churches, and other commercial facilities. In addition, we can help area homeowners with asphalt resurfacing as well. Just think: Your beat‐up blacktop could be good as new with our cost‐effective driveway resurfacing services. Put in a call to our team to have your driveway assessed!

Anytime you can save big on property improvements, it pays to learn the details. For business owners and homeowners alike, driveway resurfacing is a great way to rein in expenses while keeping your pavement looking great and performing at peak. If you’re ready to resurface a driveway in the Central Oklahoma region, look no further than our bonded and insured company. Protecting your pavement is what we’re here for.

About Piedmont, OK

Piedmont was inhabited in early historic times by Celtic-Ligurian tribes such as the Taurini and the Salassi. They were later subdued by the Romans (c. 220 BC), who founded several colonies there including Augusta Taurinorum (Turin) and Eporedia (Ivrea). After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, the region was successively invaded by the Burgundians, the Ostrogoths (5th century), East Romans, Lombards (6th century), and Franks (773).

In the 9th–10th centuries there were further incursions by the Magyars, Saracens and Muslim Moors. At the time Piedmont, as part of the Kingdom of Italy within the Holy Roman Empire, was subdivided into several marches and counties.

In 1046, Otto of Savoy added Piedmont to the County of Savoy, with a capital at Chambéry (now in France). Other areas remained independent, such as the powerful comuni (municipalities) of Asti and Alessandria and the marquisates of Saluzzo and Montferrat. The County of Savoy became the Duchy of Savoy in 1416, and Duke Emanuele Filiberto moved the seat to Turin in 1563. In 1720, the Duke of Savoy became King of Sardinia, founding what evolved into the Kingdom of Sardinia and increasing Turin's importance as a European capital.

The Republic of Alba was created in 1796 as a French client republic in Piedmont. A new client republic, the Piedmontese Republic, existed between 1798 and 1799 before it was reoccupied by Austrian and Russian troops. In June 1800 a third client republic, the Subalpine Republic, was established in Piedmont. It fell under full French control in 1801 and it was annexed by France in September 1802. In the Congress of Vienna, the Kingdom of Sardinia was restored and furthermore received the Republic of Genoa to strengthen it as a barrier against France.

Piedmont was a springboard for Italian unification in 1859–1861, following earlier unsuccessful wars against the Austrian Empire in 1820–1821 and 1848–1849. This process is sometimes referred to as Piedmontisation. However, the efforts were later countered by the efforts of rural farmers.

The House of Savoy became Kings of Italy, and Turin briefly became the capital of Italy. However, when the Italian capital was moved to Florence, and then to Rome, the administrative and institutional importance of Piedmont was reduced. The only recognition of Piedmont's historical role was that the crown prince of Italy was known as the Prince of Piedmont. After Italian unification, Piedmont was one of the most important regions in the first Italian industrialization.

Piedmont is surrounded on three sides by the Alps, including Monviso, where the Po rises, and Monte Rosa. It borders with France (Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes and Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur), Switzerland (Ticino and Valais) and the Italian regions of Lombardy, Liguria, Aosta Valley and for a very small part with Emilia Romagna. The geography of Piedmont is 43.3% mountainous, along with extensive areas of hills (30.3%) and plains (26.4%).

Piedmont is the second largest of Italy's 20 regions, after Sicily. It is broadly coincident with the upper part of the drainage basin of the river Po, which rises from the slopes of Monviso in the west of the region and is Italy's largest river. The Po drains the semicircle formed by the Alps and Apennines, which surround the region on three sides.

The countryside is very diverse: from the rugged peaks of the massifs of Monte Rosa and Gran Paradiso to the damp rice paddies of Vercelli and Novara, from the gentle hillsides of the Langhe, Roero and Montferrat to the plains. 7.6% of the entire territory is considered protected area. There are 56 different national or regional parks; one of the most famous is the Gran Paradiso National Park, between Piedmont and the Aosta Valley.

Piedmont has a typically temperate climate, which on the Alps becomes progressively temperate-cold and colder as it climbs to altitude. In areas located at low altitudes, winters are relatively cold but not very rainy and often sunny, with the possibility of snowfall, sometimes abundant. Snowfall, on the other hand, is less frequent and occasional in the northeast areas. Summers are hot with local possibilities of strong thunderstorms.

Other towns of Piedmont with more than 20,000 inhabitants sorted by population :

The population density in Piedmont is lower than the national average. In 2008 it was equal to 174 inhabitants per km, compared to a national figure of about 200. The Metropolitan City of Turin has 335 inhabitants per km2, whereas Verbano-Cusio-Ossola is the least densely populated province, with 72 inhabitants per km.

The population of Piedmont followed a downward trend throughout the 1980s, a result of the natural negative balance (of some 3 to 4% per year), while the migratory balance since 1986 has again become positive because of immigration. The population remained stable in the 1990s.

The Turin metro area grew rapidly in the 1950s and 1960s due to an increase of immigrants from southern Italy and Veneto and today it has a population of approximately two million. As of 2008, the Italian national institute of statistics (ISTAT) estimated that 310,543 foreign-born immigrants live in Piedmont, equal to 7.0% of the total regional population. Most immigrants come from Eastern Europe (mostly from Romania, Albania, and Ukraine) with smaller communities of African immigrants.

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